Dead End by Alan McFetridge

For his first solo exhibition at Wedge Gallery, Dead End, Alan McFetridge culminates work from his research project on fire ecology shot across Australia and Canada. A hauntingly beautiful array of large-scale photographs and camera-less photograms creates an acute awareness of fossil fuels danger to social, economic, and political stability.

© Alan McFetridge
© Alan McFetridge

As climate heating takes hold, McFetridge’s field studies are organised to translate the impact of 21st Century fire regimes. In these new works, which includes his latest photobook, On The Line, McFetridge moves from a distant overview of aftermath to make contact with fire itself. This progression is achieved by altering camera techniques. A tripod-mounted large format digital camera creates cinematic landscapes, composed in wide angle from human head height perspective. A bulky 6x7 analogue film camera is hand-held in near freezing conditions. Fire contact is made by adapting a technique from inventor Fox Talbot who produced his first successful photographic images in 1834 without a camera. Dried plants were collected from the forest floor and placed onto instant film. By matchstick the ignition burns the dried plants and exposes the film simultaneously.

© Alan McFetridge
© Alan McFetridge
© Alan McFetridge
© Alan McFetridge

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September

Civilization: The Way We Live Now is an international exhibition featuring 200-plus original photographs by over 100 contemporary photographers from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, and Europe.

This exhibition comprises photographs by Australian photographer Polixeni Papapetrou (1960–2018) of her daughter Olympia, covering the period from Olympia’s birth (1997) until the artist’s death (2018).

The first major survey exhibition of celebrated Australian photographer Petrina Hicks, it includes more than forty photograph and video works spanning the period 2003 to 2019.

October

A new exhibition now open at the Australian National Maritime Museum reveals some of iconic moments of World War II as captured by renowned photographer, Dorothea Lange.